What does it mean to be intersex?

SOC 64 (Sociology of Sexuality) Final Exam Study Guide

Please note this guide is not an exhaustive list of everything you will need to know for the final exam. Concepts that do not appear on this guide may still appear on the exam.

  • What are the five main types of control discussed in lecture? How do they work to regulate sex?
  • Why isn’t there a free market in sexual activity?
  • In what ways does/has the law protected and punished sexualities?
  • What are some examples of how the legal regulations around sex and sexuality have changed in recent years?
  • What type of professionals dominated the topic of sex prior to Kinsey’s research?
  • What is sex according to the Christina reading?
  • What does it mean to be intersex?
  • Explain the differences between sex, sexuality and gender. (Provide examples)
  • Are straight men who hook up with guys closeted homosexuals?
  • What is the concept of fluidity in sexuality?
    • Sexual preferences are not set in stone and can change over time, often depending on the immediate situation the individual is in. This has been described as sexual fluidity. For example, if someone identifies as heterosexual but then finds themselves in an environment with only people of the same gender, they might feel increased sexual or romantic attraction to those same-gender partners. Like any other social trait, sexual preferences, attitudes, behaviours and identity can be flexible to some degree.
  • What are the building blocks of sexual identity? Provide examples
  • What are the three main theories of the origins of sexuality? Explain them
  • What is the gender double standard?
  • What are the ways that political context constrains and enables sexual activities/identities?
  • What does Nagel mean when she says that women throughout history have been drafted into military service?
  • What are the purposes of sex?
    • Give examples of how these purposes will differ across contexts.
  • What are the relationship social containers for sex? What is different between them?
  • What is the difference between sex in a marriage and sex in a hookup?
  • Are US or Dutch parents more accepting of teenage sleepovers? Provide a reason why.
  • How have the social places for sex changed over time?
  • How does one’s location on the life course change what is acceptable sexually for them?
  • What are the different forms of social controls and how do they regulate sexuality?
    • How do they operate? How are they different or the same?
  • Windsor: Is there a difference between a man who sleeps in his girlfriends panties versus a woman who sleeps in her boyfriend’s underwear?
  • Describe how a sexual identity or activity that can be labeled both normatively wrong and medically sick.
  • Provide reasons of why sex between adults and children is illegal in most places.
  • Explain how the law can have both positive and negative roles on sexuality.
  • Give examples of ways that laws are relevant to sex and sexuality.
  • Who goes into sex work, and why?
    • Many different kinds of people go into sex work. There are some people who are forced into it. For example: sex slaves or people who just need the extra money. And there are also people who find pleasure in it so they get into it.
  • Who pays for the services of sex workers?
  • What kinds of sexual activities are the most expensive in the sexual marketplace?